Significant Trees

Significant Tree Policy

Council’s Significant Tree Policy was designed to recognise and protect trees in Kingborough that have been identified as having a high aesthetic, cultural, heritage and/or environmental values.

In February 2022 Council started public consultation on updating the Significant Tree List.

Many of the trees found in our parks, gardens and road reserves have significant aesthetic, cultural and/or historical importance. In acknowledging these important values Kingborough Council  decided to establish a Significant Tree Policy.

The policy outlines the process and the criteria to be considered for the listing or delisting of significant trees Table E24.1 of the Kingborough Interim Planning Scheme 2015. Details of the listing is also available in the link provided below. There are currently 24 listings. Some of the listings represent more than a single tree (the existing 24 listings represent a total of 425 significant trees).

What makes a tree significant?

A tree must meet the requirements of one or more categories of significance that will act to set the tree apart from others of its type to be included on in the planning scheme.

  • Aesthetic significance
  • Size (height, circumference, canopy)
  • Age
  • Landscape significance
  • Historical significance
  • Rarity of species, variety or genome
  • Unusual physical features

How to nominate a significant tree?

Council is not inviting new nominations at this point in time until the current round of consultation is completed. New nominations will be called for at a later date.

Nominations for listing or delisting must be received in writing by completing the Significant Tree Nomination Form 2022

What happens after a tree is listed in the planning scheme?

Once a tree is listed, it will not be physically sign-posted, but details of the listing will be publicised in the Planning Scheme and on Council’s website.

Any person wanting to cut, remove or otherwise alter the state of a significant tree must contact Council as a permit may be required.

In situations where an immediate risk to public safety from a significant tree is identified, Council approval must still be obtained; and Council reserves the right to require an arborist’s assessment to be undertaken. In these circumstances the decision may be determined by the General Manager under delegated authority.

Development applications that may impact or include the removal of a tree listed in Table E24.1 are required to be assessed against the Significant Trees Code of the planning scheme.